Comparisons
Gold Champagne v. Palomino

Gold champagne can be thought of as "champagne on chestnut." A palomino can be thought of as "cream on chestnut."


[SW Champagne Affair, Quarter Horse stallion]


[Eb's Sunbeam, Tennessee Walking Horse mare]

Both gold champagnes and palominos can have pink skin at birth. However, a palomino's skin begins to change to grey or black within a few days to a week. The champagne's skin will remain pink and later develop mottling - a few dark speckles. The real giveaway at this stage is the eyecolor. While palominos can have grey or navy eyes, a champagne's eyes will be bright sky blue.

 


[Cottons Pushin My Buttons, Tennessee Walking Horse stallion]


[Eb's Sunbeam, Tennessee Walking Horse mare]

The first way to distinguish between an adult gold champagne (left) and a palomino (right) is to look at their skin and eye color. The champagne has pink skin with dark mottling. Palominos will have dark skin, and occasionally that dark skin may have pink mottling.

 

 


[Eb's Sunbeam, Tennessee Walking Horse mare]

The champagne has pink skin with dark mottling. Palominos will have dark skin, and occasionally that dark skin may have pink mottling. This is especially evident around the face and eyes.

 

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