Comparisons
Amber Champagne v. Buckskin

Amber champagne can be thought of as "champagne on bay." A buckskin can be thought of as "cream on bay."


[Flash's Champagne Shocker, Racking Horse colt]


[Gambler's Texas Hold'em WF, Tennessee Walking Horse colt]

Both amber champagnes and buckskins can have pink skin at birth. However, a buckskin's skin begins to change to grey or black within a few days to a week. The champagne's skin will remain pink and later develop mottling - a few dark speckles. The real giveaway at this stage is the eyecolor. While buckskins can have grey or navy eyes, a champagne's eyes will be bright sky blue. Also, buckskins tend to be born lighter and amber champagnes tend to be born looking more like bays.

 


[SW Champagne Affair, Quarter Horse stallion]


[Golden Gambler, Tennessee Walking Horse stallion]

The first way to distinguish between an amber champagne (left) and a buckskin (right) is to look at their skin and eye color. The champagne has pink skin with dark mottling. Buckskins will have dark skin, and occasionally that dark skin may have pink mottling.

 


[SW Take Care Too, Quarter Horse stallion]


[Golden Gambler, Tennessee Walking Horse stallion]

Another way to distinguish between an amber champagne (left) and a buckskin (right) is to look the expression of the black pigment, in the case of bay-based horses such as amber champagne and buckskins, black pigment is limited to the points. Notice that the amber champagne's points are chocolate colored, while the points of the buckskin are black.

 

Copyright 2005 CHBOA. All rights reserved.